5 signs you aren’t using the meal plan right

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1. The cashier at CVS recognizes you

We all have bad days, and sometimes all you want to do is buy a sandwich from CVS. After all, there are no long lines, no crowds, and no awkward greetings when you spot that one girl from your seminar. When you go there more than five times a week, though, then it’s a problem. The cashiers at CVS should NOT be able to recognize you by the (delicious) Caesar Salad Wrap in your hand. (Side note: The cashiers at CVS are actually very friendly. I exchanged numbers with two of them just last week.)

 

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2. The freshman fifteen followed you to sophomore year

As sophomores, you’re expected to know better. Besides, it’s not like there aren’t healthy options available at the dining halls—you know, once you look past the cookies, the pizza, the pizza-cookies…you get the point. Sure, wiping out the Ratty’s dessert section is impressive, but is it really worth the diabetes?

 

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3. You eat less than two meals a day

On the other extreme, there are some who aren’t using the meal plan right because they simply aren’t using it at all. It can be tough to schedule meals throughout your day, I know. Between your six straight hours of classes from 1 to 7 and schedule of going to bed at 4 in the morning and waking up at 12 in the afternoon, when would you find the time?? However, waking up half an hour early to grab brunch probably wouldn’t kill you.

 

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4. You’re running out of points already

Sure, buying three chocolate chip muffins for an afternoon snack seems kind of necessary at this point. Then again, so does having enough points that you can get a meal when you’re actually hungry. A point is money. Literally. Use them wisely.

 

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5. You eat most of your meals in your room

While that one stranger taking up an entire table can be daunting, eating with others is all part of the college experience. It’s always okay to eat alone, but don’t try and use the take-out option to avoid awkward social interaction (tempting though it might seem). Who knows? That stranger could turn out to be one of your closest friends a year down the line—a.k.a. one more person whose points you can use.

 

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